Tag Archives: Hope Clark

Invisible Contest

ffw logoEach fall, Hope Clark hosts a Funds For Writers Essay Writing Contest, with a theme (hint: the theme is important if you want a shot at winning!)  Here are brief details to enter. Check out her site for the full details and to read previous winners. Good Luck!

Annual Contest: Funds For Writers

THEME: Invisible Writing

TOPIC Suggestions:

  • If you couldn’t publish, would you still write?
  • Do you write words you’re afraid to publish?
  • Do you hide words you hope no one will see until after you’re gone?
  • Do you write words so you can rip them up and destroy them?
  • Do you prefer to write anonymously?
  • Do you prefer to write and fear to publish?

Do you wish to fade away from the world and write?


Sometimes we write words to exorcise demons. We type or write them on paper then fear someone may read them. Whatever your issue, whatever your thought, whatever your habit, the general theme is INVISIBLE WRITING. Make the theme your own and let us know how INVISIBILITY works into your writing world. If you know anything about FundsforWriters, you know that we like lessons learned and motivational ideas.

We offer the same two categories – the $5 FEE category and the NO FEE category. Many writers do not believe in paying while others have no contrary opinion about an entry fee. Here we offer both so everyone has a choice. This way no one has an excuse not to submit.

Those that pay the $5 entry fee receive the Tweetebook of their choice.

What’s a Tweetebook? A Tweetebook is a mini-book of 20 markets that suit your specific writing genre/market/interest – a new FundsforWriters product. With the world on the run, living through electronic readers and smart phones, FFW designed a product to suit your fast-paced writing agenda. Take a peek! You receive a free one with your PAID contest entry – one to whet your appetite for more.

These are new to FundsforWriters, and our library will continue to grow with them, using popular as well as unique writing niches. So be on the lookout for more.

Remember…this is an essay, a nonfiction entry. No fiction, no poetry, no writing about someone else. We want this to be all about YOU. Entries are welcome from any race, religion, gender, nationality or other diverse group.

Prizes:


$5 ENTRY FEE Category

<!–[if !supportLists]–>· <!–[endif]–>First Place – $200

Second Place – $40

Third Place – $20

NO ENTRY FEE Category

First Place – $50

Second Place – $20

      Third Place – $10

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Filed under contests, Creative Essays

Write Guide to Holiday Shopping!

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{photo courtesy of wallpaperez.info}

I love anything “writerly.” And if you’re reading this, chances are you do too! Whether you’re buying for yourself, a writing buddy or conveniently “linking” to this post in an email to your loved ones, ideas for great gifts are always a bonus!
So, let the list of joyous writer’s gifts begin!

  1. If your magazine stockpile has become a dangerous pillar of paper – get organized! I LOVE this fabric wall-mount magazine organizer, priced about $15 from The Container Store.
  2. Keep your files neatly labeled with a Dymo Letratag Label Maker. Buy it on-line or at any office supply store for about $30. You can change the font style, size and color.
  3. Every writer needs pens, even if they primarily type their work. I love the smooth non-skip flow of the Pilot Precise V5 in black and red ink (gotta edit sometimes!)
  4. A Digital Voice Recorder is great for recording those plot twist ideas when stuck in traffic. Also beneficial for recording interviews to later transcribe. The one I use has a setting to record in separate “files” for easy tracking. RCA RP 5120-A runs about $30 and can be found at Walmart, Target, Circuit City, etc.
  5. Books! Of course, the highly acclaimed “Writer Mama, How to Raise a Writing Career Alongside Your Kids” by Christina Katz is a fav of mine. This book got me thinking seriously about the non-fiction market. Another on my own wish list: “Writing Personal Essays: How to Shape Your Life Experiences for the Page” by Sheila Bender. The market for personal stories is growing by the day and I intend to join them!
  6. Of course, general office supplies are always in need, since we use these up! Post-it’s, notecards, notebooks, binders, file folders, mailing labels are good staples (staples, too!) But for something fun and funky, try wrapables.com for cool bookends and such.
  7. If you’re getting serious about your writing and ready to take it to the next level, I recommend “Get Know Before the Book Deal“, another gem by Christina Katz. And in the meantime, order some inexpensive but quality business cards from Vistaprint.com. They have great sales and freebies!
  8. Maybe you’re a writer who’s going more techy. Some ideas would be: WritersMarket.com subscription to help find and organize all those markets, Storyright.com – a nifty software (free trial!) which helps the plotting, outlining and writing of your fiction, especially novels!, a flashdrive to save your valuable work, or a gift certificate to one of multiple on-line writing courses. I found my niche in writing short stuff and getting my first clip by taking “Writing and Publishing the Short Stuff,” valued at $199.00, you can get in the class for FREE, check out the details here.
  9. Of course, there are always the unconventional gifts writers need like time and space. Read this eye-opening article titled “Writers’ Wish Lists: More than Office Supplies,” by Melissa Mayntz in the Funds For Writers Small Markets Newsletter, (12-07-08 issue.)
  10. And if you’re still stumped, go here for a whole book of ideas, compliments of WOW! Women on Writing!

Happy shopping and remember…Santa’s watching.

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Filed under Advice, Education, Fiction, Fun Stuff, Give Aways, Markets, Non Fiction, Organization, Rest, writer markets, writers, Writing Space

Write Tight

I’ve written two rough drafts for the WOW (Women on Writing) Short Fiction Contest, deadline Aug 31. I’m not happy with either.

Why is writing short fiction, or flash fiction, so much more difficult than writing its longer cousin? Because the scene is a glimpse. The characters are full without fancy description. The dialogue is concise and propels the story forward at top speeds and comes to a surprising conclusion, hopefully leaving the reader stunned, spinning.

How do you do that? Practice. Lots of journaling and note taking on the “little things.” Write freely than hack the piece to little bits and select the most promising. Voila! Yeah, right. Writing “tight” is easier said than done.

I found C. Hope Clark’s downloaded ebook on my desktop: “Quick as a Flash” chock full of flash fiction writing tips from many experts, along with markets and contests for my writing (and yours!). I’ll keep you posted on my progress.

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Filed under Fiction, Markets, Writing prompts